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Keep Things Simple For A Healthy, Long Life

Don’t you just want to know: Does this diet really work? How should I manage these symptoms effectively? Are these meds really good for me? What vitamins should I take?

Dr John Schumann understands and writes that, he too, is frustrated by the constant misdirection, simplified science, and “get fit quick” schemes purported by the latest health fads.

He admits to being “skeptical about the newest medical technology, reports of the latest health news and fashions, and even people’s symptoms.” Why? Because his experience tells him that “health just isn’t that simple.”

What does he mean? Well, most symptoms, aren’t easily broken down to a specific cause. Doctors aren’t medical Google searches, coming up with the answers immediately based on what you’ve told them. Doctors make educated guesses, dealing in “probabilities more than providing precise diagnostic information.”

Still, there is the positive matter of prevention.

Research indicates prevention is paramount for optimal health. Most of prevention is straightforward and and easily the best health advice you’ll receive. Schumann says health is not attained through shortcuts, but by a commitment to taking care of yourself.

How?

  • Get adequate sleep.
  • Exercise. Move around every day, throughout the day.
  • Eat well — a healthy assortment of foods. Mostly plants, and moderately.
  • Interact socially. Isolation is not psychologically, emotionally, or spiritually advantageous.
  • Reflect on what and how you are grateful.

Also, consider the practices of those who live in the world’s “Blue Zones.” These are regions where people are healthiest and live the longest. They include:

  • Okinawa, Japan
  • Ikaria, Greece
  • Sardinia, Italy
  • Nicoya, Costa Rica
  • Loma Linda, Calif.

People in these areas practice preventive medicine unconsciously. Eating healthful, plant-rich diets without processed foods or refined sugar reduces disease. Walking, rather than riding most places, increases healthy exercise significantly, and “lots of intergenerational social interaction” provides support and less mental health disturbance community wide. The benefits of this type of lifestyle are well documented and the subject of ongoing study.

Read the full article here: Keep Things Simple For A Healthy, Long Life